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The Top Three Vegetarian Pet Reptiles

Posted by on May 4, 2017 in Uncategorized |

Reptiles make great pets because they are unique and fun to bring into a home. Many people enjoy having reptiles as pets for this reason, especially because they make great conversation starters. However, some people get squeamish when it comes to feeding their pet reptiles since most require live animals, such as mice or crickets. This is why you might want to consider vegetarian pet reptiles. Here are the top three contenders: An Iguana: Iguanas make for really great vegetarian pets and only require a diet full of vegetables and fruit, although vegetables are the main food since fruits are more of a treat for these creatures. The best part is that, if you have the space, you can grow all of your iguana’s food in your own backyard, which would be foods such as lettuce, kale, and other leafy vegetables. This makes feeding your iguana relatively cheap. However, even with this small diet, iguanas can become quite large, so it’s important that you have the space for them when they become bigger.  A Tortoise: Tortoises are great vegetarian pets because all they need in their diet is grass and leaves, which means they can simply eat whatever is growing in your backyard. Of course, you need a backyard that is large enough for them to roam since they can grow to be huge, at least 100 pounds. You just want to be sure that you don’t have any plants in your yard that are considered poisonous to tortoises, such as Bird of Paradise, which is a common plant to have in one’s yard.  A Spiny Tailed Lizard:  A spiny tailed lizard is another great vegetarian pet, especially because, unlike the previous two, they stay relatively small in size, so you can keep them in an enclosed cage in your home without having to worry that they will outgrow it. These lizards eat desert vegetation, though that you will probably have to purchase speciality at a reptile or general pet store. However, they also enjoy seeds, such as lentil seeds that you can purchase from your local grocery store. Overall, they are easy to take care of, but may be a bit more expensive over time versus the previous two.  Having a reptile as a pet doesn’t always have to mean that you need to feed them live meals, which is difficult for many people to cope with. The three pets mentioned in this article make great pets and tend to be cheaper than the carnivorous...

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Getting Maintenance Work Done To Your Studio Apartment? Board Your Cat For The Day

Posted by on Mar 28, 2017 in Uncategorized |

Living in an apartment that you rent means you do not have to worry about handling maintenance on your own. The first thing you will want to do when something goes wrong is call the landlord. You can help them determine whether the problem must be resolved right away or if it can be handled later on. If it is not an urgent issue, your landlord may give you a date in which the work will be done. If you know that it is going to take several hours to fix the problem, you should board your cat for most of the day. Prevent Them from Escaping One benefit that you will certainly appreciate by taking your cat to a boarding facility is that you will not have to worry about them escaping while the maintenance crew is working on your apartment. In a studio apartment, you may not be able to restrict your cat to a certain room, which would be possible in a one-bedroom unit or larger. If the workers need to enter and exit the unit on several occasions, it may be tough for them to keep an eye on your cat, especially if they have their hands full while walking inside. Avoid a Possible Injury Another benefit to cat boarding is that you will prevent your cat from being injured. Your cat’s curiosity could get them in trouble when it comes to checking things out that could be dangerous. In the case of maintenance work, they may wander around the area that is being worked on. If a refrigerator, ceiling fan, or toilet is being replaced, it will naturally bring a heavy and hazardous object into the open. Let the Workers Focus Although the workers will take care of what they need to do in the apartment regardless of distractions, they will have an easier time focusing when they do not have to watch out for a cat wandering around. It may allow them to take fewer trips to and from the unit as well as do work without being so cautious. This will ultimately get them out of your apartment sooner rather than later, and when that happens, you can head to the boarding facility to pick your cat up and bring them back to your repaired apartment. While your cat may not be too thrilled about going to a boarding facility, you will appreciate the various benefits that you get by taking them there while your apartment is worked...

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Time For Some Fun In The Sun: 4 Tips To Protect Your Dog

Posted by on Mar 28, 2017 in Uncategorized |

Summer is almost here. It’s time to start planning the adventures. If you have a family dog, it will probably be participating in some of those adventures right along beside you. While you’re protecting yourself against the sun, don’t forget about your canine family member. The sun can cause just as much harm to your dog as it can to you. Here are four simple tips that will protect your dog from the sun. Carry Extra Water If you’re going to be heading out for a day in the sun, don’t forget about hydration. While you’re packing water for you and your family, be sure to add some extra for your dog. Not sure how to provide water for your dog while you’re on the go? Bring along a collapsible camping cup. You can pour water into the cup for your dog, and then close it back up when you’re done. It’s a good idea to give your dog a drink of water each time you grab a drink. Bring on the Shades You might not realize this, but the sun can wreak havoc on your dog’s eyes. To protect your dog from UV damage, grab a pair of canine sunglasses from the local pet supply store. If you have a hard time keeping the glasses on your dog’s face, purchase a canine headband. The headband fits on your dog’s head and holds the glasses securely in place. You’ll be able to have fun with your dog without worrying about its glasses falling off. Add the Skin Protection While your dog is outside, it’s in danger of sunburn. Even if your dog has long hair, there are still areas that are exposed to the sun. Before you head out with your canine family member, apply a generous amount of sunscreen to its exposed skin, especially its nose, belly, and inner ears. If your dog has short hair, place the sunscreen in your hands and then rub your hands over your dog’s body. Keep It Cool When you start to get hot while you’re outside, chances are good that your dog is too. Bring along a bandanna and an old t-shirt. When it starts getting hot, soak both items in cool water. Tie the bandanna around your dog’s neck, and put the wet t-shirt on your dog. Be sure to choose a t-shirt size that will fit your dog without dragging on the ground. If your dog is going to join you on your summer adventures, use the tips provided here to protect it from the sun. If your dog gets sick from spending too much time in the sun, contact your local animal hospital as soon as...

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6 Things You Can Learn From Keeping An Eye On Your Dog’s Skin

Posted by on Mar 28, 2017 in Uncategorized |

Your dog’s skin is the biggest organ on their body. The skin on your dog can change based on their overall health, hormone levels, and nutritional levels. Here are six different diseases that can be spotted by keeping an eye on your dog’s skin. #1 Allergies One of the easiest things to notice by watching your dog’s skin is if they have any allergies. With dogs, both environmental and food allergies often present in the skin. When your dog has contact with an allergen, be it food or environmental, their skin often reacts by getting red and itchy. If you notice your dog’s skin getting red or itchy, try to pay attention to what foods they eat when this happens and what they encounter differently in their environment. For example, if your dog’s skin is fine when it goes outside at home, but then gets red and rash-like when you take them to the park, that indicates something in the environment at the park is causing your dog’s allergic reaction. This is important information to share with your vet and could help them more accurately diagnose your dog’s allergy source. #2 Canine Hypothyroidism Dogs, like humans, can exhibit hypothyroidism. This is actually a really common disease in dogs. Hypothyroidism happens when your dog’s thyroid gland does not generate the right amount of thyroid hormones. One of the side effects of not creating enough thyroid hormones is that your dog’s skin may start to look scaly, which can lead to skin infections developing more easily. Your dog’s coat may also start to look duller and they may lose more fur than they should. #3 Cushing Disease Cushing disease, which is referred to as hyperadrenocorticism by its formal name, is when your dog’s body produces too many cortisol steroid hormones. Too many hormones can be just as bad for your dog as too little. When your dog gets too much cortisol in their system, it can make both their skin thin and their fur thin. This can decrease your dog’s ability to protect its skin and lead to more skin infections and long-lasting wounds. #4 Zinc Deficiency If your dog is not getting enough zinc, the effects are most often seen in their skin. You will start to notice your dog losing too much fur. You will see redness or crusting develop around their eyes, and their joints will look red and seem stiff when they move them. Keep an eye on your dog’s skin. Any changes in their skin or fur that you can’t explain should be brought to your vet’s attention, since your dog’s skin and fur can tell you a lot about their overall health. Contact a company like Center-Sinai Animal Hospital for more...

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Things You Need To Know When Your Dog Dashes Through The Snow

Posted by on Mar 20, 2017 in Uncategorized |

As the winds gust and the snow accumulates, the kids’ excitement mounts at the prospect of a snow day off from school. Many dogs are equally enthusiastic about the white stuff when given the opportunity to frolic and play in the Eskimo way. The escapade provides fun and exercise for your dog and should not be discouraged if he enjoys it. However, there are some hazards you need to know about snow before that next blizzard strikes so you can keep your dog out of harm’s way. Slipping and Sliding Leads to Falling and Fracturing There is something about a change in ground cover that energizes dogs into zoom mode. They run, pounce and kick up snow with reckless abandon. If the kids are playing in the snow, the dogs want to join in on the action. Since the ground’s usual traction has been covered, this enthusiastic romp through several inches of snow or over icy terrain can result in the following injuries: Tendon or ligament tears Broken bones Strained muscles If you want your dog to enjoy some fun in the snow, try to curb his unbridled enthusiasm by providing him with a particular task to focus on. If the ground is not icy, play a few rounds of fetch by throwing a brightly colored toy straight ahead. This should keep your dog running in a straight path, reducing the need for quick twists and turns that can cause him to slip and fall. If the thrown toy sinks into the snow when it lands, he can have fun pawing at the snow in search of it. The Nose Doesn’t Know In the Snow Be sure your dog is securely contained within your yard, and use caution when opening the door to your home. Once an excited dog charges into the snowy great outdoors, he may keep running. This is how dogs become lost during snowstorms. Once the ground is covered by snow, the scents familiar to your dog are covered up as well. If your dog finds himself in these white surroundings, he may not be able to easily find his way back because his nose might not pick up the familiar scents needed to point him in the right direction. Restrict your dog’s snow day outings to your fenced yard, in which the only thing he will use his nose for is to explore and tunnel into the snow. If you do not have a fence, keep your dog on a leash when he is outdoors in the snow. You should also make sure he has an identification tag on his collar and that your contact information you listed when registering his microchip is current. A Greedy Snow Munch Is Not a Healthy Lunch In their propensity for munching on anything that looks intriguing, many dogs perceive a snowy backyard as a super-sized dish of ice cream. Dogs also tend to eat snow as an attempt to stay hydrated. While the few unavoidable licks of inquiry may not be harmful, greedy snow grazing can result in gastrointestinal upset. In addition to vomiting, ingesting large quantities of snow will contribute to lowering your dog’s core body temperature. Old snow or snow that covers certain areas of your property may contain toxins, such as traces of pesticides, antifreeze...

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What to Expect When You Have Your Kitten Spayed

Posted by on Mar 14, 2017 in Uncategorized |

If you acquired a female kitten, you likely want to bring her to a veterinarian to be spayed so she cannot have kittens of her own. Most people will bring their kitten to a veterinarian right away so they can get started with immunizations and discuss the spaying procedure. Here are some tips you can use to help in keeping your cat comfortable before and after an appointment to have her spayed. Ask the Doctor About Arrangements Beforehand Make sure to ask the veterinarian who will be performing the surgery about any specifics you need to adhere to regarding the care of your cat in the hours before the procedure. Since your cat will be having anesthesia, it will be extremely important that she does not eat or drink for several hours beforehand. Give your pet a meal an hour or so before the cutoff time. Your veterinarian will provide you with specific details regarding this matter.  It is also a good idea to find out how long the cat will be under the veterinarian’s care so you can make arrangements to go back for a pickup at the requested time. Provide Comfort to Your Feline After the Procedure When you pick up your kitten after the procedure, she may appear lethargic or woozy. Allow her to rest without worry when you arrive home. Keep others away from the cat so it can rest comfortably without loud noises or disruption. It may take a day or two until your kitten will be able to jump up on surfaces. For this reason, place a soft blanket on the floor for her to use for slumber time. Keep Your Cat from Biting Her Incision In the first few days after your cat is spayed, she may lick or bite at her incision. Some veterinarians will use the traditional method in stitching the incision with thread that needs to be removed, while others use dissolving sutures that do not require you to have a subsequent visit. Regardless of the method used, it is important to try to keep your cat from obsessively licking or biting the wound. You can try to distract your kitten with treats or petting sessions. In severe cases, a plastic cone can be placed around your cat’s head if she does not leave the incision alone. Your veterinarian would be able to provide this to you if necessary.  For more information on the procedure, contact services like Evergreen Veterinary...

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Two Often Neglected Dangers Of Leaving Cats At Home Alone While On Vacation

Posted by on Feb 16, 2017 in Uncategorized |

The long-awaited date to head out on vacation has arrived. Your bags are packed, the tickets are purchased, and you are more than ready to go. Just when you are ready to head out the door, Mr. or Ms. Kitty comes twirling around your feet and it hits you: What are you gonna do about the cat while you’re away?  If you are like a lot of pet parents, you will simply freshen up the litter pan, put out a few extra bowls of water, and make sure your cat has plenty of access to food. After all, cats are pretty self-sufficient, right? Unfortunately, this train of thought can have you coming back from vacation to a disaster. Check out these two often neglected dangers of leaving cats at home alone while you are away.  Cats can run out of food very quickly.  Felines in the wild eat food as it is available. This means that if they happen to capture a massive meaty meal, they will gorge themselves on that food for hours because it may be the last meal they get for a while. It is a little-known fact that this same behavior can be witnessed with most ordinary housecats. You may leave what you believe to be an ample amount of food available, but your cat could easily chow all of that down within the first few days of them being at home alone. Therefore, it can be very hard to ensure they will have enough food to last them for anything more than a few days.  Cats are curious enough to get themselves into major trouble.  Chasing a mini-blind string because it twitches with the breeze of a fan, poking a nose into an open cabinet, and slapping at a electrical cord because, well, it is there—all of these are common cat behaviors. While these fun little quirky behaviors may give you a laugh when you’re at home, while you are away on vacation, your cat could get itself into trouble. Cats really do need a certain level of supervision because their curiosity could indeed kill them if there is no human around to come to the rescue.  Before you skip off on your merry way with a suitcase and big dreams of vacation on your mind, it is always a better idea to ensure your kitty has someone looking out for it. Contact a cat boarding facility near you to schedule an extended stay for your pet while you are...

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Puppy Love: How To Pick The Right Pup For Your Family

Posted by on Dec 1, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

When you’ve made the decision to get a dog, you want the whole experience to be a positive one, both for your family and for the dog. Before you rush out and buy the first puppy you find, like any blue pitbulls for sale, it’s important to know how to evaluate a litter. Here are some tips to help you select the best possible pup for your family. Why You Should Take Your Time Choosing a puppy is a major decision. The dog’s personality and temperament will have a significant effect on the general atmosphere in your home, as well as the success of this new arrangement. Many people suggest just sitting down and letting the puppy pick you. While this may be successful sometimes, it’s not typically the best approach. In some cases, choosing the one that seems most excited to see you only results in you choosing the most outgoing, rambunctious and attention-demanding pup of the bunch. Instead, taking time to observe the whole litter gives you the chance to see each dog’s personality. This way, you can be more likely to choose a puppy that will become a happy and cohesive member of the family. Physical Evaluation Start by checking each dog closely to evaluate physical health and well-being. Healthy puppies should be energetic and responsive. A quick look at each puppy’s eyes should reveal clear eyes free of any discharge. The puppy’s noses should also be free of discharge. There should be no signs of frequent coughing or sneezing, and you shouldn’t be able to hear loud breathing sounds from most puppies. Watch the puppies move. They should play and move easily without seeming stiff. Their bodies should show some fat over the rib cage, as this is a sign that they are eating well. You should be able to clap your hands behind the puppy’s head and get an immediate reaction. This is a sign of good, clear hearing. Behavior Considerations Before you choose a puppy from the litter, carefully observe each dog’s behavior. The personality you see exhibited in puppy play and behavior is often the underlying personality you’ll see in your adult dog. Interaction You’ll want a puppy with good social skills, but not one that’s the boss of the litter. The goal is to choose a puppy that’s well-adjusted, happy and playful, but not excessively pushy or overwhelmingly shy. Bossy and pushy puppies can develop into pushy adult dogs, and most timid or shy puppies don’t fully overcome that as they grow into adults. Personal Attention Once you’ve watched the puppies at play, you have a good idea of which ones are showing personality traits you like. When you narrow down the ones that play normally and seem healthy, it’s time to see how they interact with you one-on-one. Sometimes, a puppy that’s well-adjusted to his or her littermates will suddenly become paralyzed with fear when faced with human interaction. Avoid this risk by spending time with each puppy. Look for one responsive to you, as well as playful and mild-tempered. Puppies that nip and bite aggressively without adjusting behavior when you correct them may become full-grown dogs that behave the same way. And puppies that are jumpy, afraid of noises or just not interested in interacting with you may not be...

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Canine Toothaches: Five Signs Your Dog May Be Suffering

Posted by on Nov 21, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Because dogs cannot express toothache pain, it’s up to their owners to recognize the symptoms so veterinary treatment may be given. Although your pet cannot verbalize the discomfort, there are subtle signs to look out for. If your dog begins refusing hard foods, starts drooling excessively or rubs its mouth against anything, dental pain could be the reason. If you suspect your dog has a toothache, see your veterinarian at once to avoid potential health complications. Five Tell-Tale Signs of a Canine Toothache 1. Refusal to Eat Hard Foods Has your dog previously enjoyed hard, crunchy foods, yet suddenly begun to refuse them? If your dog has been accustomed to a dry food diet and suddenly begins favoring the canned variety, it may be more than boredom with its diet. Eating crunchy or hard foods may intensify your pet’s dental pain. As your dog chomps down, the sensitive nerve endings in a decayed tooth may throb, as force is exerted in the area. The same may apply when chewing on a bone or dog biscuit. Your pet may not feel the discomfort as much when eating moist or canned foods, however. Although a loss of appetite is not common in the early stages of periodontal pain, this may change as the issue progresses. If left untreated and if the dental pain becomes severe, your dog may refuse eating altogether. This may quickly become a serious issue. 2. Excessive Drooling Just as babies droll when teething, a dog with tooth pain may experience the same. Although some breeds tend to drool more than others, look for sudden changes. A pet that has never drooled heavily in the past may experience an increased flow of saliva when experiencing dental pain The drooling may indicate a fracture of the tooth or gum disease. You should be able to notice a broken tooth by looking inside your dog’s mouth. Do so with caution, as a dog in pain is more prone to bite. As you plan your visit to the veterinarian, offer your dog plenty of fresh water. Excessive drooling may dehydrate your dog, which may lead to health complications. 3. Mouth Rubbing or Other Odd Behavior Has your dog suddenly begun rubbing its mouth against the furniture or the wall? Your pet could be expressing toothache distress. A dog with a toothache may also swipe at its mouth with its paw. Also, a dog experiencing tooth pain may shake its head rapidly or tilt the head sideways. 4. Specks of Blood on Your Dog’s Toys As your dog chews its toys, the inflamed gums may begin to bleed. You might notice a drop or two of blood on the dog’s bedding or food bowl as well. To be certain the bleeding is coming from the gums, have your pet examined by a veterinarian. 5. Bad Breath Foul breath in a dog is most commonly caused by periodontal issues. Over time, this may lead to severe mouth pain. Bad breath may also be indicative of other health problems as well, so have your pet examined by the vet to rule out other possible causes. Canine Toothache Treatment Any of the aforementioned signs should warrant a visit to the veterinarian. It’s important to note that dental issues may eventually lead to health complications affecting...

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Canine Conundrums: How To Bottle-Feed And Raise Abandoned Puppies

Posted by on Nov 12, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

If you’ve taken in abandoned newborn puppies in their first few days of life, you’re facing a significant commitment of bottle feeding and care. When the mother isn’t available, the next best option for these young pups is another dog that’s still nursing puppies. If you don’t have a suitable dog to nurse them, you’ll need to reach out to an emergency veterinarian right away and set up a feeding and care schedule. Here are some tips to help you care for those young pups and keep them safe until they’re ready to eat on their own. Bottle-Feeding Basics If you’ve ever had a baby, you know that the newborn stages are full of around-the-clock feedings, changes and care. Newborn puppies are not much different. The best place to start is to get a canine milk replacement formula. Talk to your veterinarian about the best milk replacement for the pups to ensure that they have what they need to thrive. When it comes to feeding time, prepare the formula as directed. Make sure that you read the packaging, because the ratio of the powder to water can be different from brand to brand. Once the formula is ready, it’s time to feed the puppies. If the puppies are only a day or two old, you’ll probably have to start the feedings with a syringe. Your veterinarian can supply one that’s suitable for feeding. Hold the puppy on his belly to avoid the risk of getting formula in his or her lungs. The standard guideline is to feed one CC of formula per ounce of body weight if you’re doing eight feedings a day. Draw the formula into the syringe, and feed the puppy by placing the tip of the syringe gently against his or her mouth until you stimulate the suckling reflex. Then, gradually release the formula. Within the first few days or a week, you’ll want to consider switching from the syringe to a bottle. Let the growth of the puppies determine it, though. When the syringe isn’t enough anymore, make the shift to a bottle for more formula capacity and easier feedings. Burping About halfway through the feeding, stop and pick the puppy up. Place his or her tummy against your shoulder and rub or pat the puppy’s back to encourage him or her to burp. Do this again at the end of the feeding. It’s important to do this twice at each feeding, though the pup may not burp every single time. After the feeding, your puppy should rest comfortably. If the pup is still whimpering or restless, it’s a sign that he or she may be cold or still hungry. Make sure that there’s a warm heating pad in the bed area to keep the puppy warm, and try the burping process again. If you can rule out cold and gas bubbles, the puppy may still be hungry. Try feeding a small amount to see if that helps. Other Care Considerations Try not to handle the puppy any more than you have to. Make sure that the puppies are warm and well fed, but don’t try to actively socialize them until they’re a few weeks old. Puppies don’t start to develop eyesight until three to four weeks old, so you don’t want to handle them much...

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Your Anxious Dog: Nail-Trimming Tips

Posted by on Nov 12, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

If you can hear your dog’s nails scratching your wood floors when he runs through the house or you have been on the receiving end of a sharp claw while teaching your pooch to “shake hands,” you know it’s time to trim his nails. If your dog tends to be anxious or jumpy, this can be a questionable proposition; you need to be careful to avoid hurting your dog, and you also need to make sure that he does not hurt you! Keep these tips in mind for a low-stress nail-trimming session. Rely on the Pros at First If your pup isn’t used to regular nail-cutting, or you have had a rough experience with this, it might be best to defer to either your veterinarian or a professional groomer at first. This way, your dog can begin to associate the task with someone else, and will get used to the sensation without your nerves making him even more anxious. This can be done at a regular well-visit or grooming session, or you can make an appointment for just this service. Go Slowly As long as your dog has recently had his nails trimmed by someone else and he’s not gouging holes in your leather sofa, there’s no reason to try to get all of the nails cut in one fell swoop. If you can only trim one or two nails per session, then that’s fine! Just remember which paw you started with and be sure to eventually get to all of them. Gather Your Supplies It’s best if you can get comfy with your dog in a relaxing area, so get everything that you might need before you begin. You’ll want to pick up a pair of dedicated dog nail clippers; even if your dog’s nails are small, human nail clippers may squeeze them too much and split them. Ask your vet or groomer which type he or she recommends. You should also have a towel, dog treats and styptic powder. You can buy the styptic powder, which also comes in pencil form, at your local pharmacy or at a pet supply store. Relax Your Dog Depending on your dog’s size, hold him on your lap or sit next to him on the floor. Pick up one of his paws. If he resists, let go and give him a treat. Do this several times in a row. Soon, your dog will decide that having his paw touched is not a terrible thing, because a treat immediately follows. Next, hold the nail clippers next to one of his nails. Again, wait a second or two, then let go and give your pup a treat. If your dog seems stressed out by any of this, feel free to call it a day. Pet him, then find something else to do with him, like playing outside. Make the First Cut Once your dog seems comfortable with you handling his feet, which might be after several days of foot-handling and treat-eating, plan to cut just one nail. Begin with the relaxation procedure as described above, and then move along to actually using the nail clippers. Cut just a small amount off of the nail; if you cut too far, you might hit the quick, which is a sensitive area that will bleed. Nicking...

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